Raise the damn debt ceiling already

As if the new agreement between the president and Congressional Republicans — to cut $38 billion in spending while the economy is still in a near-depression — weren’t bad enough, now the word is that the Republicans say they won’t vote to raise the debt ceiling, at least not without extracting several pounds of flesh first. Worse still, the overwhelming majority of the public opposes raising the debt ceiling.

I’ve blogged about this topic before. Not raising the debt ceiling would be like pushing the economy off a cliff. With a deficit of $1.5 trillion (and GDP of about $14 trillion), Congress would have to cut spending or raise taxes (or some combination thereof) by more than 10% of GDP. You don’t get that money back. That would be a depression of titanic proportions.  It would be ruinous under virtually any circumstances, but all the more so now, at a time of high unemployment. Herbert Hoover’s and FDR’s budget-balancing blunders during the Great Depression would be trivial by comparison. And Congress probably couldn’t come up with $1.5 trillion or anything close to that anyway. Normally we pay off our Treasury bonds as they come due by selling more bonds, which we would not be able to do anymore if the ceiling is kept constant. So we would default on all the maturing debt, and our new bonds would lose their AAA status, instantly and permanently, and we’d have to pay higher interest rates on our new bonds. With enough defaults our bonds would quickly be junk bonds, paying sky-high interest rates. This would add to the federal deficit and debt, possibly a lot.  So much for looking out for future generations.

If the Republicans pull the same game of brinkmanship that they did last week in nearly shutting down the government, by convincingly threatening to not to raise the debt ceiling and then raising it at the last minute, the bond market will still go oink (as one of my grad school professors used to say), and interest rates on Treasury bonds will still shoot up, meaning higher interest payments and a higher burden of paying them off. Bond investors hate uncertainty, and if default even looks possible, they will no longer regard Treasuries as riskless.

All of this opposition to raising the debt ceiling is a combination of cynicism, ignorance, and self-sabotage. We do have a long-term debt problem that needs to be addressed, but blowing up the economy is the most idiotic and counterproductive solution imaginable. Threatening to blow up the economy is not much better. As long as the economy is in a slump, the optimal amount of spending cuts is $0 (if continued stimulus is out of the question), not $1.5 trillion. And it would be even more optimal to have no more debt ceiling.

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2 Responses to “Raise the damn debt ceiling already”

  1. Mark E Says:

    Largely, I believe the impetus for threatening to oppose raising the debt ceiling is simply political. My guess is the GOP feels that any backlash resulting from a debt ceiling will fall squarely on the Dems and Obama. What seems illogical often becomes perfectly clear once politics is factored in. However, ignorance certainly explains the majority of the public.

  2. Bummer in the summer « Blogging Through the Wreckage Says:

    […] Blogging Through the Wreckage An econ professor tries to get a grip on the economic and financial crisis « Raise the damn debt ceiling already […]

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